Unhappy Republicans pondering their choices for 2012

Politics, Presidential Elections, US Elections, US Politics

Gallup has a new poll up already about the presidential elections of 2012. Which will be sure to either make you run off screaming, or sigh contentedly at the brief respite from post-elections detox.

It asked Republicans and Republican-leaners, “Now, thinking ahead to the 2012 presidential election, please say whether you would, or would not like to see each of the following¬†Republicans run for president in 2012”. I turned the results into this graph:

Poll: Which of these Republicans would you like to see run for President in 2012?

Poll: Which of these Republicans would you like to see run for President in 2012?

I don’t know about you, but what struck me most about these numbers is just how disgruntled Republicans are right now about the choices they have at hand. There’s not one person in this list that is not dismissed by at least about a third of Republicans. Of the ten potential wannabees, just three at least enjoy a reasonably significant positive balance.¬†

There seems to be a broad rejection of both the recent and further past of the party. Poor Jeb Bush faces the second largest deficit of all, presumably mostly because of the burden of his family name. Newt Gingrich, painful to his renowned ego it may be, is rejected by a plurality of Republicans. Congressional veteran and McCain sidekick Lindsey Graham is the least popular of the lot. Even General Petraeus, so passionately defended by conservatives against his MoveOn detractors, is rejected by almost 40%. Republicans love a military bigwig to defend, but apparently really want to move beyond the associations with Iraq.

It’s maybe no coincidence that the top three choices – Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney and Mike Huckabee – are all very much newcomers to national Republican politics. Huckabee was derided by practically the entire Republican establishment, including the traditional leaders of the religious right, but there he is, the third most viable candidate on the shortlist. Hell, in this context Rudy Giuliani merits a fifth place, even after his disastrous crash-and-burn primary campaign.

Notably, two of the top three are conservative hardliners, with little appeal to the middle-ground of US politics. Democrats will be glad: it seems that the road back to power will be long and winding for the GOP.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. sozobe  •  Nov 24, 2008 @1:22 pm

    I’m kind of surprised that Jeb Bush gets such high negatives. Even though his little bro is pretty much universally reviled right now, I thought Jeb was always considered the more mature and intelligent of the two.

    Dunno whether to be delighted or appalled that Palin seems to do the best out of anyone — I’ll go with delighted I think.

    Also a bit surprised at Jindal’s poor showing — he keeps coming up in “the future of the GOP” discussions. Maybe a punditocracy/ general population schism there.

    Of course there’s plenty of time for someone new to burst on the scene, or for one of these someones to turn things around.

    Have you found a similar poll from Dems in 2004? Wonder what that looked like. I bet Clinton was on it and scored high, but Obama?

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